Page 102

Junio 2017

artículo de revisión systems versus conditioning-activated specific sub-systems. 782 J Neurosci 1999; 19 (1): 484-94. 19. Lipman JJ, Miller BE, Mays KS, Miller MN, North WC, Byrne WL. Peak B endorphin concentration in cerebrospinal fluid: reduced in chronic pain patients and increased during the placebo response. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1990; 102 (1): 112-6. 20. Petrovic P, Ingvar M. Imaging cognitive modulation of pain processing. Pain 2002; 95 (1-2): 1-5. 21. Zubieta JK, Bueller JA, Jackson LR, Scott DJ, Xu Y, Koeppe RA, et al. Placebo effects mediated by endogenous opioid activity on mu-opioid receptors. J Neurosci.  2005; 25 (34): 7754-62. 22. Zubieta JK, Yau WY, Scott DJ, Stohler CS. Belief or need? Accounting for individual variations in the neurochemistry of the placebo effect. Brain Behav Immun  2006; 20 (1): 15-26. 23. Peciña M, Love T, Stohler CS, Goldman D, Zubieta JK. Effects of the Mu opioid receptor polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on pain regulation, placebo effects and associated personality trait measures. Neuropsychopharmacology  2015; 40 (4): 957-65. 24. De la Fuente-Fernández R, Ruth TJ, Sossi V, Schulzer M, Calne DB, Stoessl AJ. Expectation and dopamine release: Mechanism of the placebo effect in Parkinson’s disease. Science 2001; 293 (5532): 1164-6. 25. Scott DJ, Stohler CS, Egnatuk CM, Wang H, Koeppe RA, Zubieta JK. Placebo and nocebo effects are defined by opposite opioid and dopaminergic responses. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2008; 65 (2): 220-31. 26. Lotta T, Vidgren J, Tilgmann C, Ulmanen I, Melén K, Julkunen I, et al. Kinetics of human soluble and membrane bound catechol O-methyltransferase: a revised mechanism and description of the thermoabile variant of the enzime. Biochemistry 1995; 34 (13), pp 4202-10. 27. Tammimaki A, Mannisto PT. Catechol-O-methyltrasnferase gene polymorphism and chronic human pain: a sistematic review and meta-analysis. Pharmacogenet Genomics 2012; 22 (9): 673-91. 28. Hall KT, Lembo AJ, Kirsch I, Ziogas DC, Douaiher J, Jensen KB, et al. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism predicts placebo effect in irritable bowel syndrome. 2012. PLoS One 2012; 7 (10): e48135. 29. Mickey BJ, Ducci F, Hodgkinson CA, Langenecker SA, Goldman D, Zubieta JK. Monoamine oxidase A genotype predicts human serotonin 1A receptor availability in vivo. J Neurosci 2008; 28 (44): 11354-9. 30. Leuchter AF, McCracken JT, Hunter AM, Cook IA, Alpert JE. Monoamine oxidase a and catechol-o-methyltransferase functional polymorphisms and the Vigencia del efecto placebo - D. Aceituno et al placebo response in major depressive disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol 2009; 29 (4): 372-7. 31. Bhathena A, Wang Y, Kraft JB, Idler KB, Abel SJ, Holley Shanks RR, et al. Association of dopamine-related genetic loci to dopamine D3 receptor antagonist ABT- 925 clinical response. Transl Psychiatry 2013; 3: e245. 32. Tiwari AK, Zai CC, Sajeev G, Arenovich T, Müller DJ, Kennedy JL. Analysis of 34 candidate genes in bupropion and placebo remission. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol  2013; 16 (4). 33. Peciña M,  Martínez-Jauand M,  Love T,  Heffernan J, Montoya P, Hodgkinson C. Valence-specific effects of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on dopaminergic stress and reward processing in humans. J Neurosci 2014; 34 (17): 5874-81. 34. Lavigne GJ, Hargreaves KM, Schmidt EA, Dionne RA. Proglumide potentiates morphine analgesia for acute postsurgical pain. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1989; 45 (6): 666-73. 35. Noble F, Roques BP. The role of CCK2 receptors in the homeostasis of the opioid system. Drugs Today (Barc)  2003; 39 (11): 897-908. 36. Benedetti F, Amanzio M, Casadio C, Oliaro A, Maggi G. Blockade of nocebo hyperalgesia by the cholecystokinin antagonist proglumide. Pain 1997; 71 (2): 135-40. 37. Rotzinger S,  Vaccarino FJ. Cholecystokinin receptor subtypes: role in the modulation of anxiety-related and reward-related behaviours in animal models. J Psychiatry Neurosci 2003; 28 (3): 171-81. 38. Benedetti F,  Lanotte M,  Lopiano L,  Colloca L. When words are painful: unraveling the mechanisms of the nocebo effect. Neuroscience 2007; 147 (2): 260-71. 39. Gardner EL, Vorel SR. Cannabinoid transmission and reward-related events. Neurobiology of disease 1998; 5 (6 Pt B): 502-33. 40. Hohmann AG. Spinal and peripheral mechanisms of cannabinoid antinociception: behavioral, neurophysiological and neuroanatomical perspectives. Chemistry and physics of lipids 2002; 121 (1-2): 173-90. 41. Salio C, Fischer J, Franzoni MF, Mackie K, Kaneko T, Conrath M. CB1-cannabinoid and mu-opioid receptor co-localization on postsynaptic target in the rat dorsal horn. Neuroreport 2001; 12 (17): 3689-92. 42. Peciña M, Martínez-Jauand M, Hodgkinson C, Stohler CS, Goldman D, Zubieta JK. FAAH selectively influences placebo effects. Mol Psychiatry 2014; 19 (3): 385-91. 43. Furmark T, Appel L, Henningsson S, Åhs F, Faria V, Linnman C, et al. A link between serotonin-related gene polymorphisms, amygdala activity, and placebo-induced relief from social anxiety. J Neurosci 2008; 28 (49): 13066-74. Rev Med Chile 2017; 145: 775-782


Junio 2017
To see the actual publication please follow the link above